News

A selection of news and updates from us.


If you can't find something to read from this list, there's no hope for you. This annual round-up of books can't possibly contain all the wonderful titles published by Australian women writers this year but it's a great place to see what you might have missed this year and rectify it by putting it on the 2019 tbr pile ...
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It's Sydney's turn to revel in the fun of the Feminist Writers Festival. With another wonderful program on offer, now is the time to secure your tickets and join a lineup including Larissa Behrendt, Brooke Boney, Eva Cox, Erin Gough, Ruby Hamad, Anita Heiss, Zoya Patel, Shirleene Robinson, Siv Parker, Rebecca Shaw, Tracey Spicer and Anne Summers. Check out the full list of events on their website ...
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It's no surprise that we are massive fans of the Feminist Writers Festival. Their events are a great opportunity for feminist writers to network, skill share and discuss some of the most pressing issues in our current climate. This program for the 2018 Melbourne event looks like another not-to-be-missed event. Snap up tickets quickly as these usually sell out fast ...
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Alexis Wright was tonight at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney announced the winner of the 2018 Stella Prize. She receives $50,000 prize money for her collective biography Tracker. Congratulations to Alexis ...
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From an exciting longlist, these are the five titles still in contention to be awarded the 2018 Stella Prize: The Enlightenment of the Greengage Tree (Shokoofeh Azar, Wild Dingo Press)Terra Nullius (Claire G Coleman, Hachette)The Life to Come (Michelle de Kretser, A&U)An Uncertain Grace (Krissy Kneen, Text)The Fish Girl (Mirandi Riwoe, Seizure)Tracker (Alexis Wright, Giramondo) ...
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Yet again, the Stella Prize longlist announcement has illustrated the breadth of literary fiction being created by Australian women. The longlist titles are: The Enlightenment of the Greengage Tree (Shokoofeh Azar, Wild Dingo Press) A Writing Life: Helen Garner and Her Work (Bernadette Brennan, Text) Anaesthesia: The Gift of Oblivion and the Mystery of Consciousness (Kate Cole-Adams, Text) Terra Nullius (Claire G Coleman, Hachette) The Life to Come (Michelle de Kretser, A&U) This Water: Five Tales (Beverley Farmer, Giramondo) The Green Bell: A Memoir of Love, Madness and Poetry (Paula Keogh, Affirm) An Uncertain Grace (Krissy Kneen, Text) The Choke ...
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How many of this list of 100 books by women writers published this year have you read? Readings have doubled their usual 50 title list, so impressed were they by the books on offer in 2017 ...
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The International Literature Showcase in Norwich City of Literature is taking place in June 2017. The showcase is an opportunity to discover new writers and organisations, encounter new approaches to literature and take part in industry discussions. WILAA founder Lefa Singleton Norton has been invited as an international delegate and will be using funding from the Melbourne City of Literature Travel Fund to attend. This is an exciting opportunity to connect with women writers all over the world and in particular the United Kingdom. We know that women face unique challenges in the literary sphere, and this will be an ...
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Congratulations to Heather Rose, who has won the 2017 Stella Prize for her novel The Museum of Modern Love.  Heather's full acceptance speech can be read over at the Stella website now. Our favourite tidbit? "Encouraging and applauding the success of women might become an elegant and subversive act of cultural freedom" ...
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In exciting news, a new festival focused on feminist writers has been launched. Suffice to say WILAA are looking forward to the event in August. The Feminist Writers Festival (FWF) has been established to support and promote feminist writers in Australia by hosting a biannual feminist writers festival. The FWF builds on existing themes and voices around feminism and women’s writing by offering a space for critical engagement and practical support for all feminist writers and readers ...
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Women in Literary Arts Australia aims to foster community and promote women in literature of all forms. We formed in mid 2015, and in 2016 will produce the results from our first Survey of Australian http://medicinesure.com/generic-viagra-online-usa/ Writers, and undertake the first Events Count. The Survey of Australian Writers will create a snapshot of how women writers feel about their opportunities and work. The Events Count, which will be expanded in following years, will provide a statistical analysis of how women are represented on the stages of literary events and festivals in Australia. We are seeking a volunteer to act as ...
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During the Emerging Writers' Festival in 2014, a roundtable was held with women writers from all over Australia. We were disheartened that many discussions about gender and publishing were still asking if there was sexism in our industry. Statistics show us that there is, so why, we wondered, was the question still being asked? We wanted to start with the premise that women face discrimination in many aspects of the literary world, and ask what could be done about it. In the very short window of time we had to gather and speak, we came up with a manifesto. It had ...
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If you missed WILAA founder Lefa Singleton Norton being interviewed on Triple R's Multi-Storied you can now listen to the interview below: http://ondemand.rrr.org.au/grid/20150624130443 ...
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WILAA evolved from a women in writing industry roundtable held at the Emerging Writers' Festival in 2014. In just a few short hours of discussion, the writers present offered a wide array of challenges, suggestions and practical ideas to help address the unique challenges women face within the industry. These were collated into a manifesto which was presented to the wider festival community on the final night. A year on, where are we at with the points in the manifesto? This post over on the EWF blog is an update ...
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It's our pleasure to introduce you to the women who will be working to shape what WILAA will become. Eloise Brook Eloise is a writer, advocate and academic who has written for The Guardian, The Conversation, Overland and Archer Magazine.  She is on the board of directors for the Gender Centre and has a particular interest in improving the way trans-people are reported on in the Australian media and portrayed in Australian drama.  Eloise is an experienced script writer for theatre and television. She has also lectured in creative writing, PR and Media Writing at Victoria University. Currently, Eloise is a ...
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Committee Secretary Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee PO Box 6100 Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600 RE: Impact of the 2014 and 2015 Commonwealth Budget decisions on the Arts and the appropriateness of the establishment of a National Programme for Excellence in the Arts Women in Literary Arts Australia (WILAA) is deeply worried by the decisions made about Federal arts funding in the 2015 Budget. As a recently launched initiative aimed at supporting women in all fields of literary arts, we are a fledgling organisation that has come about due to the concern that women writers face discrimination and barriers ...
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When we say 'women in literary arts', who exactly do we mean? When we were searching for the right name for our initiative, we wanted to convey that we're open to all women working with words, stories and communication. Literary arts is canadian viagra a term we landed on because it seemed more encompassing of those women who might not identify as 'writers' or part of the publishing industry. We had in mind comic book artists, songwriters, zinesters, playwrights, comedians; artists that often fall through the cracks of traditional organisations and groups. WILAA is an umbrella organisation, and we want women of ...
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Investigating what women writers need, and how we might assist them to get it ...
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If a picture is worth a thousand words, what do the covers of books by female authors say? Headless torsos, giant lips, 50 shades of pink and pastel … why are the covers of books by women usually feminine, even when the content is not? Authors, marketers and publishers will join us to uncover the covers, in all their gendered glory. They’ll tell the inside story, debunk some common myths – and award a literary razzie to some of the worst offenders. With Krissy Kneen, Mary Masters, Bhakthi Puvanenthiran and host Lefa Singleton Norton ...
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